Whatever happened to acid rain? – Joseph Goffman 0 (0)

From TED Ed. Discover what causes acid rain, and how scientists were able to largely eliminate this major environmental threat. — In 1963, scientists studying Hubbard Brook Experimental Forest made a shocking discovery. Their most recent rainfall samples were nearly 100 times more acidic than usual; which could destroy the area’s ecosystems in a matter…

The surprising secrets of hummingbird flight – Kristiina J. Hurme and Alejandro Rico-Guevara 0 (0)

From TED Ed. Dig into the incredible fighting, feeding, and flying capabilities of hummingbirds. — In just a matter of seconds, hummingbirds can perform astonishing aerial acrobatics, eat lunch in midair, pollinate a flower, even escape threats while upside-down. And they can do this all while achieving sustained hovering flight— an aerial feat no other…

How does ultrasound work? – Jacques S. Abramowicz 0 (0)

From TED Ed. Discover how scientists and doctors used bats’ ultrasound capabilities as inspiration for SONAR and non-invasive medical procedures. — In a dark cave, bats can’t see much. But even with their eyes shut, they can navigate rocky topography at incredible speeds. This is because bats aren’t just guided by their eyes, but rather,…

Why every world map is wrong – Kayla Wolf 0 (0)

From TED Ed. Dig into the inaccuracies of flat maps and how different map designs can shift our point of view. — Fourteen Greenlands could fit in Africa— but you wouldn’t guess it from most maps of the world. The fact is, every world map humans have ever made is wrong. Actually, it’s impossible to…

Ugly History: The Spanish Inquisition – Kayla Wolf 0 (0)

From TED Ed. Dig into the era of the Spanish Inquisition, when the Catholic Church was charged with rooting out and punishing heresy. — In 1478, Pope Sixtus IV issued a decree authorizing the Catholic monarchs, Ferdinand and Isabella, to root out heresy in the Spanish kingdoms. The inquisition quickly turned its attention to ridding…

What’s the best fuel for your car? 0 (0)

From TED Ed. Dig into which fuel— gasoline, electric, biofuels, or electrofuels— is both affordable for consumers and sustainable for the planet. — Historically, most cars have run on gasoline, but that doesn’t have to be the case in the future: other liquid fuels and electricity can also power cars. So what are the differences…

A brief history of antidepressants – Neil R. Jeyasingam 0 (0)

From TED Ed. Dig into the discovery of antidepressant drugs, how they work, and what we still don’t know about depression. — In the 1950s, the discovery of two new drugs sparked what would become a multi-billion dollar market for antidepressants. Neither drug was intended to treat depression at all— many doctors and scientists believed…

How much land does it take to power the world? 0 (0)

From TED Ed. Explore the sustainability of fossil fuels, nuclear power, and renewable energy and how much space each of these power sources use. — No matter how we make electricity, it takes up space. Coal requires mines, and plants to convert it into electricity. Nuclear power takes uranium mines, facilities to refine it, a…

How does artificial intelligence learn? – Briana Brownell 0 (0)

From TED Ed. Explore the three major methods of machine learning, which allows computers to write their own rules to problem solve and process data. — Today, artificial intelligence helps doctors diagnose patients, pilots fly commercial aircraft, and city planners predict traffic. These AIs are often self-taught, working off a simple set of instructions to…

How much electricity does it take to power the world? 0 (0)

From TED Ed. Discover how much electricity humanity uses, and how clean energy sources could help revolutionize our energy supply in the future. — All around the world, millions of people are flipping a switch, plugging in, and pressing an ‘on’ button every second. So how much electricity does humanity use? And how much will…

Las Mariposas: How three sisters defied a dictator – Lisa Krause 0 (0)

From TED Ed. Get to know the story of the Mirabal sisters, who led a revolution against Rafael Trujillo’s dictatorship in the Dominican Republic. — For over 30 years, thousands of people were imprisoned, tortured, and murdered under Rafael Trujillo’s dictatorship in the Dominican Republic. Three sisters would go on to lead an underground revolution.…

The material that could change the world… for a third time 0 (0)

From TED Ed. Explore the role concrete plays in global warming and how scientists are working to create a cleaner, more sustainable concrete. — Today roads, sidewalks, bridges, and skyscrapers are made of a material called concrete. There’s three tons of it for every person on Earth. It’s also played a surprisingly large role in…

The world’s biggest battery looks nothing like a battery 0 (0)

From TED Ed. Discover the world’s biggest battery and explore how inventors are creating other giant batteries to help power the world— sustainably. — As of 2020, the world’s biggest lithium-ion battery is hooked up to the Southern California power grid and can provide enough power for about 250,000 homes. But it’s actually not the…

The “myth” of the boiling frog 0 (0)

From TED Ed. Explore how greenhouse gas emissions impact global warming and why it’s necessary to get emissions down to net zero. — Since 1850, global average temperatures have risen by 1 degree Celsius. That may not sound like a lot, but it is. Why? 1 degree is an average. Many places have already gotten…

The unexpected math of origami – Evan Zodl 0 (0)

From TED Ed. Dig into the mathematical rules and patterns of folding origami, the ancient Japanese art of paper folding. — Origami, which literally translates to “folding paper,” is a Japanese practice dating back to at least the 17th century. In origami, a single, traditionally square sheet of paper can be transformed into almost any…

What if every satellite suddenly disappeared? – Moriba Jah 0 (0)

From TED Ed. Explore what would happen if all of humanity’s satellites disappeared and the real-life scenarios that could lead to such a catastrophe. — What would happen if one day all of humanity’s artificial satellites suddenly disappeared? Within hours, most of the planet’s traffic would grind to a halt, the world economy would shut…

A brief history of divorce – Rod Phillips 0 (0)

From TED Ed. Dig into the complicated history of divorce— from the earliest known divorce laws in ancient Mesopotamia to modern day. — Formally or informally, human societies across place and time have made rules to bind and dissolve couples. The stakes of who can obtain a divorce, and why, have always been high. Divorce…

Why bats don’t get sick – Arinjay Banerjee 0 (0)

From TED Ed. Explore the relationship between viruses and their hosts, and find out how the evolutionary adaptations of bats keep them safe from viruses. — Consider a bat that is infected with several deadly viruses, including ones that cause rabies, SARS, and Ebola. While this diagnosis would be lethal for other mammals, the winged…

The rise of the Ottoman Empire – Mostafa Minawi 0 (0)

From TED Ed. Explore the early days of the Ottoman Empire, as shrewd political rulers grew the principality into an intercontinental empire. — In the late 13th century, Osman I established a small principality sandwiched between a crumbling Byzantine Empire and a weakened Sultanate of the Seljuk of Rum, in what is now Turkey. In…

Who decides how long a second is? – John Kitching 0 (0)

From TED Ed. Discover how scientists developed atomic clocks, which use the vibrations of atoms to measure and maintain a globally consistent time. — In 1967, researchers gathered to answer a long-running scientific question: just how long is a second? It might seem obvious at first. A second is the tick of a clock, the…

These squids can fly… no, really – Robert Siddall 0 (0)

From TED Ed. Dive into the incredible flying capabilities of squids, and how they use flight as a survival tactic. — In 1947, explorers noticed a strange phenomenon while crossing the Pacific Ocean. Somehow, small squid known to live deep beneath the waves kept appearing on the roof of their boat. The crew was mystified—…

How do personality tests work? – Merve Emre 0 (0)

From TED Ed. Examine how popular personality tests, like the Myers-Briggs Type Indicator and the Enneagram, are designed and their inconsistencies. — In 1942, a mother-daughter duo named Katherine Cook Briggs and Isabel Briggs Myers developed a questionnaire that classified people’s personalities into 16 types. Called the Myers-Briggs Type Indicator, or MBTI, it would go…

What happens when you die? A poetic inquiry 0 (0)

From TED Ed. Dive into Emily Dickinson’s “Because I could not stop for Death” and explore life’s greatest mystery: what happens when you die? — Death, a kindly gentleman riding in a horse carriage, comes to collect a woman for her journey to the afterlife. So begins Emily Dickinson’s poem “Because I could not stop…

A quantum thought experiment – Matteo Fadel 0 (0)

From TED Ed. Can you win a game of quantum foosball— using a giant electron instead of a ball? Explore how to use quantum mechanics to your advantage. — After a long day working on the particle accelerator, you and your friends head to the arcade to unwind. The lights go out for a second,…

The world’s largest organism – Alex Rosenthal 0 (0)

From TED Ed. Discover the world’s largest organism: Pando, an enormous and ancient quaking aspen, and find out how it became so huge. — The largest animal in the world is the blue whale, which weighs a massive 150 metric tons. Even so, it’s not remotely close to being the largest organism by weight. That…

The most colorful gemstones on Earth – Jeff Dekofsky 0 (0)

From TED Ed. What gives opals their signature shimmering colors? Dig into the science of the gemstone’s formation, millions of years in the making. — In November 1986, Australian miners climbed Lunatic Hill and bored 20 meters into the Earth. They were rewarded with a fist-sized, record breaking gemstone, which they named the Hailey’s Comet…

How fast is the speed of thought? – Seena Mathew 0 (0)

From TED Ed. Travel into the brain to see how its network of neurons transmit your thoughts and what factors determine how quickly you think. — Your mortal enemy has captured you and hooked you up to a bizarre experiment. He’s extended your nervous system with one very long neuron to a target about 70…

How do investors choose stocks? – Richard Coffin 0 (0)

From TED Ed. Explore the strategies investors use to choose stocks and learn whether it’s better to be an active or passive investor. — Every day, billions of stocks are traded on the New York Stock Exchange alone. But with over 43,000 companies listed on stock exchanges around the world, how do investors decide which…