The One day Republic: Carpatho-Ukraine

From The History Guy. The German invasion of Poland was dramatic, and drew the attention of the entire world, but fighting had actually begun even earlier as Germany sought to press its territorial ambitions. Often overlooked, actual combat occurred six months earlier, and not far from the Polish border with Czechoslovakia, in a tiny, autonomous…

The 1908 Sullivan Ordinance

From The History Guy. At the turn of the 20th century the world was facing a host of changes- industrialization, urbanization, mechanization, and a revolution in the role of women in society. And not everyone was on board with the changes. The conflict came to a head in January, 1908, when the New York City…

The 1862 Battle of Prairie Grove Arkansas

From The History Guy. Watch Civil War: The Untold Story "Bloody Shiloh" for FREE until January 27, 2021: https://www.magellantv.com/series/civil-war-the-untold-story/bloody-shiloh You can also gain access to MagellanTV’s entire history collection with my SPECIAL OFFER, a 1-month free membership: https://try.magellantv.com/historyguy. On December 7th, 1862, Confederate forces under General Thomas Hindman marched against a Union force in northwestern…

THG Podcast: Useful Resources: The Histories of Helium and Asbestos

From The History Guy. This is an episode of the THG Podcast, which posts to YouTube once every two weeks in addition to regular History Guy content, about a month after it releases to podcast services. Subscribe to the RSS feed: https://feeds.captivate.fm/thehistoryguy/ Check out our new community for fans and supporters! https://thehistoryguyguild.locals.com/ On today’s episode…

The Adventures of Charles DeRudio

From The History Guy. The History Guy remembers Carlo Camillo Di Rudio who was notably hard to kill. His story is a ripping yarn that deserves to be remembered. This is original content based on research by The History Guy. Images in the Public Domain are carefully selected and provide illustration. As very few images…

Demologos: The World’s First Steam Powered Warship

From The History Guy. The world’s first steam-powered warship was designed by one of the most famous engineers if the era. The steam battery Demologos was almost an analogy for the energy of the United States as it entered the nineteenth century and established a new prominence on the world stage. This is original content…

NASA Surveyor: First Lunar Landing

From The History Guy. The NASA Surveyor program represented America’s first lunar landing, and the 87,000 pictures the Surveyor spacecraft sent home dramatically increased our understanding of our planet’s closest neighbor and only natural satellite. Please consider joining our new community where you can connect with The History Guy and team! The History Guy Guild…

The Great New York Fire of 1835

From The History Guy. Just as the city was establishing itself as the financial capital of the United States, a combination of the results of rapid population growth and terrible weather resulted in a fire that laid waste to the wealthiest part of America’s wealthiest city. As the New York Mercantile Advisor wrote, “there is…

Hen Fever

From The History Guy. In the 1850s, a fad started by Queen Victoria set off a massive increase in price for some very special items. Queen Victoria acquired a huge collection, and soon others in England and even elsewhere were jostling to get the best and most beautiful collections, competing over aesthetics and value. This…

Zip Codes: A History

From The History Guy. Though we usually take it for granted today, the development of a system that allows nearly anyone to hand off a package and trust that it will later arrive where you want it to was an incredible advancement, and one that is vital to modern life as we know it. This…

The 2007 Boston Mooninite Panic

From The History Guy. Dozens of movies have included fantastic plotlines about Earth being invaded by aliens from another planet. It is a common movie theme, but not one you expect to see in real life. But, one winter day in Boston, the city found itself under siege by invaders from the moon, and the…

Christmas Cards: A History

From The History Guy. The Christmas season is full of all kinds of traditions, many of which are different depending on what part of the world you’re in. But many of the traditions are similar as well, including one whose history you might ever have thought about: the Christmas Card. Among the earliest of modern…

Halifax and the Boston Christmas Tree

From The History Guy. One of America’s most famous Christmas trees is intimately linked to one of the most devastating explosions in human history. The story is one of great tragedy, great heroism, and human compassion, that goes to the heart of the true meaning of Christmas. This is original content based on research by…

USS Macon

From The History Guy. The age of rigid and semi-rigid airships like the famous Hindenburg was a brief but exciting time, as the impressive ships promised to be part of a technological revolution. In the late 1920s the US began testing their use as flying aircraft carriers, able to launch and recover planes from the…

Guns of USS Texas

From The History Guy. Probably the most visible part of what makes a battleship a battleship are her guns – both the enormous main batteries and the dozens of smaller guns that dot the deck and superstructure. And the guns of USS Texas, fired at D-Day, at Iwo Jima, even at Wake Island – have…

A History of Microfilm

From The History Guy. The use of microforms, where images and documents are reduced in size, can greatly reduce the amount of space necessary to store documents. But the history of this kind of microphotography has touched considerably more than just document storage. This is original content based on research by The History Guy. Images…

Aftermath: December 8

From The History Guy. December 7, 1941 is remembered as the date that will live in infamy, but that term was spoken by President Franklin Roosevelt on December 8th. Nowhere was the weight of history more obvious than in the territory of Hawaii. This is original content based on research by The History Guy. Images…

Andy Granatelli: Motorsport Legend

From The History Guy. Andy Granatelli was involved with cars from a young age, the race that would receive most of his interest was the so-called “Greatest Spectacle in Racing”: the Indianapolis 500. On the way he would make a name for himself both on and off the track, showing a flair for the dramatic,…

Dynamite Luke Dillon and the Welland Canal

From The History Guy. Around 7 in the evening on April 21, 1900 two large explosions rocked the hamlet of Thorold, Ontario. It was an act of terrorism, an attempt to breach the locks of the Welland canal- a ship canal connecting Lake Ontario to Lake Erie, allowing ships to bypass Niagara Falls. Three men…

The White Ship

From The History Guy. A single event in 1120 set off years of war and instability that would lead to the rise of house Plantagenet, which ruled England until 1485. That one event was a disaster with reverberations throughout history, one of those moments on which history pivots. This is original content based on research…

Eugene Francois Vidocq: The First Modern detective

From The History Guy. Eugene Francois Vidocq, was alternately a criminal, the head of the French Secret Police, a failed entrepreneur, and a private detective. This is original content based on research by The History Guy. Images in the Public Domain are carefully selected and provide illustration. As very few images of the actual event…

Tootsie Roll Saviors: Military Candy

From The History Guy. When you think of military equipment, you might think of anything from tanks to socks, battleships to bandages. But one thing that doesn’t typically come to mind is candy. But sweets and soldiers have a long history, candy has changed the military, wars have changed candy, and military candy has changed…

Pineapple: the King of Fruits

From The History Guy. Pineapples are so culturally significant that pineapples adorn the tops of cathedrals, and serve as the domicile of one of the world’s most popular cartoon characters. An estimated 300 billion pineapples are farmed each year, and a 2021 YouGov poll lists pineapples as the sixth most favorite fruit, ahead of all…

Omar Ibn Said: Futa Toro Scholar

From The History Guy. For many descendants of slaves, the history of what came before was forgotten – the names of their ancestors, of their homes, and of their cultures. Relatively few were able to leave memories of their lives and stories of what came before them, and even fewer were able to leave their…

Desperate Battle: USS Borie vs U-405

From The History Guy. By October 1943, the tide in the Battle of the Atlantic had turned, and the allies had shifted from fighting on the defensive to taking the battle to the U-boats themselves. But fishing for U-boats in millions of miles of ocean was a daunting task, and a dangerous one, as the…

Four Days of Naples

From The History Guy. Watch The Battle of Monte Cassino: Hitler’s Soft Underbelly for FREE until November 11, 2021: https://www.magellantv.com/video/the-battle-of-monte-cassino-hitlers-soft-underbelly. You can also gain access to MagellanTV’s entire history collection with my SPECIAL HOLIDAY OFFER: Buy one, get one free annual membership. https://try.magellantv.com/historyguy. As the first month of the allied invasion of Italy came to…

Operation Outward

From The History Guy. Though relatively famous, the Japanese Fu-Go balloon bombs did little damage. But there was another balloon operation, similar in concept, that proved much more effective, and yet is considerably less well known. On the other side of the world it was the British who turned to balloons to wreak havoc on…

Jan Potocki: Werewolf of the Enlightenment

From The History Guy. When the first European translation of Arabian Nights appeared in the Eighteenth century, it inspired others – including one truly remarkable Polish nobleman who wrote one of the strangest novels in history. The man who wrote it was nearly as odd, a polyglot and adventurer named Jan Potocki, who at the…