Best of The History Guy: Aviation Disasters

From The History Guy. Five classic The History Guy episodes on Aviation Disasters. One Hour of The History Guy! As THG was returning from a speaking engagement in the UK this week, we decided to release this "supercut" of classic episodes. We might do this again from time to time. If you have constructive advice…

Khutulun: Warrior Princess

From The History Guy. As Marco Polo traveled through the lands where descendants of Genghis Khan ruled pieces of what was once the world’s largest empire, he spoke of one in particular whose tale seems to have come straight out of a fairy tale. In the 1260s he met one of the great-great-grandaughters of Genghis,…

Chainsaws and Childbirth

From The History Guy. When you consider the history of the chainsaw you might imagine that it’s only connection to medicine would be the average of approximately 28,000 chainsaw injuries reported in the US annually. But you would be wrong. The shocking history of the mechanically driven cutting tool with teeth set on a chain…

The Seven Seas

From The History Guy. Watch Britain’s Outlaws: Highwaymen, Pirates and Rogues, Episode One: Highwaymen for FREE until June 22. https://www.magellantv.com/series/britains-outlaws-highwaymen-pirates-and-rogues You can also gain access to MagellanTV’s entire history collection with my SPECIAL OFFER, a 1-month free membership: https://try.magellantv.com/historyguy. As any fan of the history guy knows, all good stories involve Pirates. And of course…

A History of Rabies

From The History Guy. Despite millennia of struggle against the disease, rabies remains one of the deadliest illness known to man. Check out our new community for fans and supporters! https://thehistoryguyguild.locals.com/ This is original content based on research by The History Guy. Images in the Public Domain are carefully selected and provide illustration. As very…

USS Tennessee

From The History Guy. USS Tennessee was already an aging vessel when she was moored alongside USS West Virginia and ahead of USS Arizona on December 7, 1941. But the "Big Ten" would not only survive the attack, she would go on to participate in more battles and fire more salvos than any other US…

The Bone Wars

From The History Guy. The discovery of a dinosaur fossil in New Jersey in 1858 sparked a period of intense popular and scientific interest in dinosaurs called “Dinosaur Mania”. Competition between museums to collect specimens led to an oft-forgotten period and a professional rivalry between two men who helped change the face of paleontology –…

Salisbury Steak: The First Fad Diet

From The History Guy. It has been estimated that as much as two-thirds of deceased soldiers in the US Civile War were killed not by bullets but by disease, with the most prevalent of those diseases being the intestinal illnesses diarrhea and dysentery. It was not clear, based on the established medical knowledge, exactly what…

Venus De Milo: Disarming Beauty

From The History Guy. From the THG Archive: When a Greek peasant found a sculpture on the island of Milos, France saw a chance to regain lost glory. The History Guy remembers how the ghost of Napoleon helped to turn the armless beauty called the Venus de Milo into one of the most recognized sculptures…

Just Judges: An Unsolved Mystery

From The History Guy. "The Adoration of the Mystic Lamb" is a work that has been so adored that it has become infamous as the most stolen artwork in history. Of all the many times the piece was stolen, however, there is one incident that stands above the rest as probably the most significant theft,…

Closest to the Stars: Captain Hawthorne Gray

From The History Guy. Charles Lindberg’s was not the only feat of aeronautics to come out of the St Louis area in 1927. Much less remembered but no less daring, were the efforts of an Army officer, Captain Hawthorn C Gray, to rise higher than any had before. Check out our new community for fans…

Ham Radio and Operation Deep Freeze

From The History Guy. The eleven nations included in the Antarctic portion of the 1957-1958 International Geophysical Year created several permanent research stations, including the first permanent station at the South Pole. The effort to create a permanent scientific presence at, literally, the end of the earth required enormous effort of scientists and military personnel.…

San Diego’s Hurricane Giraffes

From The History Guy. In 1938, the merchant steamer SS Robin Goodfellow was caught in the Great New England Hurricane. On board the ship were some unique passengers: two Giraffes. Those Giraffes, caught in a storm that killed hundreds of people, were en route to San Diego, California, and the storm was only the beginning…

The 1983 “Gimli Glider” Incident.

From The History Guy. Captain Sully’s US Airways Flight 1549 lost its engines almost immediately after takeoff, after reaching an altitude of only 2,800 feet. In 1983, a very different flight lost power at a staggering 41,000 feet, and the pilots had no choice but to try to land the plane without engines. Check out…

The Indiana Central Canal

From The History Guy. Though nearly forgotten now as they have become largely obsolete in the face of rail and road, canals were for a time the end-all be-all of transportation technology, and the building of a canal could guarantee prosperity for the towns it traveled through. Hoping to get in on the game, the…

1147: Siege of Lisbon

From The History Guy. Watch She-Wolves: England’s Early Queens Episode 1: Matilda and Eleanor for FREE until April 21, 2022: https://www.magellantv.com/series/shewolves-englands-early-queens-4k/matilda-and-eleanor You can also gain access to MagellanTV’s entire history collection with my SPECIAL OFFER, a 1-month free membership: https://try.magellantv.com/historyguy. The Second Crusade would be led by two of the most powerful kings of Europe,…

Continents: A History

From The History Guy. "Echoes of History: Ragnarök" is a historical podcast inspired by the video game "Assassin’s Creed Valhalla : Dawn of Ragnarök." It’s the second season of Ubisoft’s popular podcast “Echoes of History." Subscribe to the "Echoes of History" podcast, wherever you get your podcasts: https://lnk.to/echoesofhistory If you’re from the United States, it’s…

Last War Patrol of HMS Terrapin

From The History Guy. On her seventh war patrol, in the south Java Sea, the T class British submarine HMS Terrapin and her crew had faced the terror of battle and barely survived. Badly damaged and far from home, sometimes the drama of war is not just in the battle, but in the voyage home.…

Juan Sebastián de Elcano

From The History Guy. One of the items that has spent the most time on The History Guy set is a wooden ship model of the Juan Sebastian de Elcano. The tall masted barquentine and the explorer after whom it was named deserve to be remembered. This episode was originally produced for our community on…

Werner Forssmann, the Doctor That Touched His Own Heart

From The History Guy. More than one doctor has found their theories dismissed by the existing establishment, only to be proven right years later. Perhaps none of those stories are more dramatic than the story of Werner Forssmann, who, when faced with defeat, simply chose to go around everyone and do his experiment anyway –…

The Aero Spacelines Pregnant Guppy

From The History Guy. As the US honed in on what it hoped would be its notable fist in manned space exploration, a problem arose that required a unique solution. Surprisingly, the answer to this problem of cutting edge technology turned out to be an obsolete piece of equipment that came as the result of…

Harald Hardrada: King of Norway

From The History Guy. "Echoes of History: Ragnarök" is a historical podcast inspired by the video game "Assassin’s Creed : Dawn of Ragnarök". It’s the second season of Ubisoft’s popular podcast “Echoes of History. ”Subscribe to the "Echoes of History" podcast, wherever you get your podcasts: https://lnk.to/echoesofhistory The year 1066 has become indelibly linked to…

History Remembered: Historic Markers

From The History Guy. Whether you are one of those who stops to read every one, or one of those that just take them for granted, historic markers are the fruit of the efforts of many groups and people who believe in an important maxim: that history deserves to be remembered. Learn more about National…

1884 Cincinnati Courthouse Riot

From The History Guy. On March 26th, 1884, the city of Cincinnati, Ohio was on edge, waiting for a jury to convict a defendant who was accused of murdering a man in December of the year before. That verdict did come down guilty, but not for murder. Instead, the man was convicted of manslaughter. That…

The 1788 Great Fire of New Orleans

From The History Guy. French Quarter dot com, notes: “ Looking at the vibrant, festive Quarter with millions of visitors annually, it is hard to imagine the devastation of Holy Saturday morning in 1788. Smoking ruins stretched from Chartres to Dauphine Street, and from Conti to St. Philip.” The 1788 great fire of New Orleans…

Rocket Mail

From The History Guy. During the cold war the US postal service had a novel idea, one that they thought would pair space age technology with even faster mail delivery. Check out our new community for fans and supporters! https://thehistoryguyguild.locals.com/ This is original content based on research by The History Guy. Images in the Public…

Ghosts of America’s Past: Buildings of the Kirkbride Plan

From The History Guy. St. Elizabeth’s Hospital in Washington D.C., once called the Government Hospital for the insane, is representative of more than seventy such campuses made up of massive, ornate Victorian buildings designed by some of the most notable architects in the nation, and built across America over a sixty-five year period. Their now…

1944 Bombing of Miles City, Montana

From The History Guy. It was one of those dramatic events in time of war. Civilians, threatened by an invasion by a remorseless and intractable enemy, desperately calling for military bombers to attack that enemy as it surged towards the defenseless town. In a raging storm a brave crew of volunteers for the dangerous mission,…

The Great Blizzard of 1888

From The History Guy. The winter of 1888 had been exceptionally mild — until a blizzard struck suddenly, changing the face of New York City and most of the eastern coast of the United States forever. It was the deadliest winter storm in U.S. history. They called it, "The Great White Hurricane." Expanded version of…

Equality Wyoming Style: The Girl Guards

From The History Guy. Wyoming was the first US state to allow women to vote and first state to have a female governor. How, exactly, did a sparsely populated frontier land of cowboys end up on the cutting edge of gender equality decades ahead of the 19th amendment? In a uniquely Wyoming way, including frontier…

Turning Point: Lam Son 719

From The History Guy. On March 7, 1971, more than a thousand US planes engaged in bombing missions, along with combat missions involving hundreds of helicopters, in a war that was supposed to be nearly over, in a battle intended to prove that the US was no longer needed. Operation Lam Son 719 is both…

OSS Detachment 101

From The History Guy. Watch Burma: Forgotten Allies for FREE until March 10, 2022: https://www.magellantv.com/video/burma-forgotten-allies You can also gain access to MagellanTV’s entire history collection with my SPECIAL OFFER, a 1-month free membership: https://try.magellantv.com/historyguy. Often forgotten, fierce and vital fighting took place in the China-Burma-India Theater, including some of the most effective intelligence and guerilla…

Claude Chappe and the Napoleon Telegraph

From The History Guy. The development of technology for speedy long-distance communication dates back to antiquity, and reached its pre-electronic peak in the telegraph before Samuel Morse’s telegraph. Before wires crossed the world, Napoleonic France could send a message from Paris to Lille, a distance of some 250 kilometers, in ten minutes. Check out our…

Free Black People of Revolutionary America

From The History Guy. Before the Civil War and the Fourteenth amendment, there were free blacks who lived, thrived, and contributed significantly to the early history of the United States. Of course life as a free black American in the colonies was not easy, and they faced a myriad of challenges that related directly to…

Ninety Day Wonders: US Army Officer Candidate School

From The History Guy. Watch Dick Winters: Hang Tough for FREE until March 3, 2021: https://www.magellantv.com/video/dick-winters-hang-tough. You can also gain access to MagellanTV’s entire history collection with my SPECIAL OFFER, a 1-month free membership: https://try.magellantv.com/historyguy. Between 1938 and 1945 the US Army expanded from 174,000 troops to over eight million. To provide trained officers to…