The Powhattan Disaster 0 (0)

From The History Guy. The week of Easter, 1854, a powerful nor’easter, that peculiar type of storm that occurs in the North Atlantic caused when a cold air mass from Canada runs into warm gulf stream current, struck the US and Canadian eastern seaboard. The mighty storm would result in the loss of a ship…

The History Guy Podcast, Unsung Heroes: The First Cartridge Video Game Console and “Brave Bessie” 0 (0)

From The History Guy. Joshua Geiger, The History Guy’s son, chats with THG about the creation of episodes of forgotten history and trivia in a behind-the-scenes look at The History Guy channel. Find the podcast on your favorite podcast app with RSS feed: https://feeds.captivate.fm/thehistoryguy/ This episode includes a story only told on the podcast! On…

The “Great Olive Poisoning” of 1919 0 (0)

From The History Guy. On Saturday, August 23rd, 1919 the Lakeside club of Canton Ohio held a dinner and dance to celebrate the return of Colonel Charles C Weybrecht, formerly adjutant general of the state of ohio and most recently commander of the US 146th infantry regiment, just returned from the war in France. The…

The History Guy Podcast: The Wild West: The Outlaw Who Couldn’t Ride a Horse and Soapy Smith 0 (0)

From The History Guy. Joshua Geiger, The History Guy’s son, chats with THG about the creation of episodes of forgotten history and trivia in a behind-the-scenes look at The History Guy channel. Find the podcast on your favorite podcast app with RSS feed: https://feeds.captivate.fm/thehistory…​ On this episode of the History Guy Podcast, The History Guy…

Walt Haaser’s B-17 Bailout 0 (0)

From The History Guy. At just the age of 20, Walt Haaser was in charge of a B-17 bomber crew of ten men. In April, 1945, he and his crew would make a desperate escape in their stricken bomber. Special thanks to Fred Haaser This is original content based on research by The History Guy.…

Vitus Bering and the European Discovery of Alaska 0 (0)

From The History Guy. It wasn’t until the 18th century that Russia decided to explore their Pacific coast, sending a Danish explorer to map the furthest reaches of their dominion, and determine whether or not Asia and the Americas were connected. That Danish explorer’s name was very nearly lost to history, and while you might…

James “Doc” McFadden and the Hurricane Hunters 0 (0)

From The History Guy. Deliberately flying an airplane into a hurricane might seem crazy. Deliberately flying a plane into a hurricane for the purpose of research, to better understand, and thus better prepare people, for the hurricane’s wrath might seem heroic. Doing that nearly six hundred times in a career spanning more than five decades,…

The 1831 City Bank of New York Robbery 0 (0)

From The History Guy. Sometime between when First Teller Lancaster S Burling locked up the vault in the City Bank of New York on Saturday, March 19, 1831 and when he opened the bank on Monday, someone entered the vault and stole the astounding sum of $240,000. It was not, as some newspapers at the…

The Samoan Crisis of 1889 0 (0)

From The History Guy. The idyllic South Pacific islands of Samoa seem an odd spot for colonial conflict. Yet the German Empire and the US nearly went to war over control of the archipelago. In 1889 the series of islands, thousands of miles from the US and German capitals, became the center of colonial machinations…

Olive Ann Beech: The First Lady of Aviation 0 (0)

From The History Guy. Among the earliest and most influential people to emerge in the flight industry was Olive Ann Beech, co-founder of the Beechcraft Aircraft Corporation. Olive Ann led the company as it built iconic planes for civilians and the military, and helped to design important technology for NASA. In her decades of work…

Mae West and the 445th Bombardment Group 0 (0)

From The History Guy. The self inflated life preserver called the "Mae West" saved countless lives during the Second World War, and continues in service today. A vest sent by a viewer illustrates both the history of the life saving equipment, and the experience of the pilot who owned it. Special thanks to James Powell.…

Three Stories of the Dreaded “88.” 0 (0)

From The History Guy. Get your exclusive offer for our viewers for MagellanTV here: https://try.magellantv.com/historyguy. MagellanTV is a new kind of streaming service run by filmmakers with 3,000+ documentaries! Check out our personal recommendation and MagellanTV’s exclusive playlists: https://www.magellantv.com/explore/history. Of all the German weapons of the second world war, perhaps none was more feared by…

The History Guy Podcast: Aviation Accidents 0 (0)

From The History Guy. Joshua Geiger, The History Guy’s son, chats with THG about the creation of episodes of forgotten history and trivia in a behind-the-scenes look at The History Guy channel. The inaugural episode of The History Guy podcast features two stories of forgotten history about aviation accidents. First, in 1966, an SR-71 "Blackbird"…

Hello Girls of the US Army Signal Corps. 0 (0)

From The History Guy. When the first members of the American Expeditionary Force arrived in France in 1917 they found that the telephone lines already in operation were overloaded. To solve the problem, John J Pershing called for experienced, bilingual switchboard operators, which meant women. Hundreds would don the uniform and answer the call as…

Task Force 45 and the Italian Campaign 0 (0)

From The History Guy. Created from AAA units in order to fill a desperate need for riflemen, though it would only operate for a few months of bitter fighting, Task Force 45 must be considered to be one of the most peculiar allied fighting units of the second world war. This is original content based…

The “Long Winter” of 1880/81 0 (0)

From The History Guy. The winter of 1880/81, popularized by author Laura Ingalls Wilder’s 1940 novel “The Long Winter,” was variously described as “the hard winter,” “the black winter,” the “long winter,” the “starvation winter,” or the “snow winter.” Journalist J Mark Powell wrote in January, 2018 “Think you’ve seen severe winter weather? No matter…

Vanilla: A History 0 (0)

From The History Guy. ‘Vanilla’ has come to mean ‘standard’, ‘ordinary’ or even ‘boring. But the story of Vanilla is considerably more complex than that. It is a centuries long epic involving a child genius, modern chemistry, and a much more complex flavor than it is given credit for. This is original content based on…

The Birth of Naval Aviation 0 (0)

From The History Guy. 110 years ago Glenn Hammond Curtiss, at the time called by the press “the fastest man alive,” ate lunch with the officers of the armored cruiser USS Pennsylvania. It was a more auspicious event than it sounds, because that lunch represented what some describe as “the birth of naval aviation” This…

The Tamale Wars 0 (0)

From The History Guy. Though they might not be the king of street food today, a hundred years ago Tamales dominated street corners, with tamale vendors becoming so popular that turf wars broke out. Though it was briefly impossible to avoid tamaleros, they vanished almost as quickly as they came. The history of the “Tamale…

USS Jamestown and the Great Famine 0 (0)

From The History Guy. The US sloop of war USS Jamestown entered Cork harbor the morning of April 15, 1847. While the US was at war with Mexico at the time, the mission of the Jamestown was one of mercy. The History Guy recalls the forgotten history of one of the earliest examples of a…

Human Zoos and Ota Benga 0 (0)

From The History Guy. In September of 1906, visitors to the Bronx Zoo found a new exhibit. Standing in a cage in the Monkey House was not an animal, but a young man, dressed in a loincloth and holding a bow with arrows. Though many details of his life are uncertain, what we do know…

The Misadventures of Truman C Everts 0 (0)

From The History Guy. Get your free trial of MagellanTV here: https://try.magellantv.com/historyguy. It’s an exclusive offer for our viewers: an extended, month-long trial, FREE. MagellanTV is a new kind of streaming service run by filmmakers with 3,000+ documentaries! Check out our personal recommendation and MagellanTV’s exclusive playlists: https://www.magellantv.com/explore/history. The amazing story of Truman Everts is…

The Lady Franklin Bay Expedition of 1881- 1884 0 (0)

From The History Guy. In 1881 the United States joined an international effort to study the earth’s polar regions. The expedition would become a dramatic fight for survival. This is original content based on research by The History Guy. Images in the Public Domain are carefully selected and provide illustration. As very few images of…

The Fez 0 (0)

From The History Guy. Mostly recognized as a lodge hat for fraternal orders in the United States, the short, cylindrical hat with a tassel has a long and important history. Also called a Tarboosh, the hat is so culturally significant that it has, at different times, been both required and banned. This is original content…

The Great War, USS Texas, and the Grand Fleet 0 (0)

From The History Guy. USS Texas saw important service during the Second World War, including the Normandy Invasion. But the ship’s much less remembered service with the Allied Grand Fleet during the Great War reminds us that sometimes the most important battle is the one you do not have to fight. Please support The Battleship…

Missiles over Mexico: A Cold War Story 0 (0)

From The History Guy. In the decades following the Second World War, missiles of all kinds would come to dominate military technology, and that would produce an unexpected threat… to Mexico. The US missiles that blundered across the southern border during the cold war are history that deserves to be remembered. This is original content…

Mercy Dogs of the Great War 0 (0)

From The History Guy. Dogs have accompanied men into war probably for most of human history, but WWI was the first war where they were used in an official and broad capacity to find the wounded. Mercy dogs, also known as casualty dogs, or ambulance dogs, served on all sides of WWI, and saved thousands…

Bugles in Military History 0 (0)

From The History Guy. One of the items from the History guy set that has gotten the most attention for viewers is the bugle, which hangs on the wall. This bugle in b-flat brings to mind the interesting history of the instrument and how bugles have been used on the battlefield. Their origins are ancient,…

Sliced Bread and the Second World War 0 (0)

From The History Guy. Sliced bread is the standard for greatness. No one seems to ask what was the greatest thing before sliced bread, and many compete over what is the greatest thing since. But, in 1943, sliced bread was about to encounter the largest war in human history, leading many to argue that the…

1958 Mars Bluff Nuclear Bomb Incident 0 (0)

From The History Guy. In 2003 Walter Gregg, then 82, said "Not too many people can say they’ve had a nuclear bomb dropped on them. Not too many would want to." The 1958 Mars Bluff nuclear weapon incident deserves to be remembered. This is original content based on research by The History Guy. Images in…

The Great Sicily Earthquake of 1693 0 (0)

From The History Guy. The Sicily earthquake of 1693 was the most powerful in recorded Italian history, and was so devastating that it changed the nature of architecture throughout the region. It is history that deserves to be remembered. This is original content based on research by The History Guy. Images in the Public Domain…

The Extraordinary Voyage of the USS Marblehead 0 (0)

From The History Guy. By May 1942, nearly half of the forty surface ships of the U.S. Asiatic fleet would be sunk, including the fleet’s largest vessel, the heavy cruiser USS Houston. But the improbable survival of one of the fleet’s vessels, the light cruiser USS Marblehead, is the stuff of legend. The extraordinary voyage…

Last Stand of the Inca Empire 0 (0)

From The History Guy. The most successful of the Inca resistance leaders was the Spanish installed emperor, Manco Inca, who rebelled in 1535 and briefly threatened the Spaniard’s hold on the Empire. The last stand of the Inca Empire is history that deserves to be remembered. This is original content based on research by The…

January 1 and the New Year 0 (0)

From The History Guy. In a sense, every day could be seen as the beginning of the new year, in that every day occurs about 365 days after the same day the previous year. So how did we come to adopt January 1st as the beginning of the year? This is original content based on…

The Great Paris Moustache Strike of 1907 0 (0)

From The History Guy. In 1907, class friction in France was coming to a boil. In defiance of the strict rules being placed on them from their employers and high-class Parisians, men across Paris were walking off the job, determined not to be humiliated any longer. A great strike had begun, and the working class…

Christmas Trees: A Forgotten History 0 (0)

From The History Guy. The history of the Christmas tree is rather interesting, being both surprisingly ancient, and surprisingly new, with a host of different traditions, and many innovations, one involving a toilet brush. The History Guy recalls the forgotten history of Christmas trees. This is original content based on research by The History Guy.…

Executive Vision: A Forgotten History of Presidential Eyeglasses 0 (0)

From The History Guy. You can find my glasses at GlassesUSA.com. Check them out here for a great offer & free shipping https://bit.ly/HistoryGuy-GlassesUSA (Additional rules may apply, free shipping to US & CA) My Glasses: Ottoto Mexicali – https://bit.ly/HistoryGuy-Mexicali Elliot – https://bit.ly/HistoryGuy-Elliot Marcelinho – https://bit.ly/HistoryGuy-Marcelinho Ottoto Piero – https://bit.ly/HistoryGuy-Piero Revel Glow – https://bit.ly/HistoryGuy-Revel Blue Light…

Adda Howie: The Woman Who Sang to Cows 0 (0)

From The History Guy. In 1914, the Arizona Prescott Journal-Miner stated that Adda Howie was "one of the most famous women in the United States." Yet few people remember her name today. "The woman who sang to cows" helped to develop the Wisconsin Dairy Industry, and became world famous as a result. Special thanks to…

Carl G Fisher, Promotional Genius 0 (0)

From The History Guy. Despite suffering from acute astigmatism and dropping out of school at age 12, Carl G. Fisher went from one huge project to another, constantly finding success in unexpected places through a combination of grit, ingenuity, and dedication. He helped to start the Indianapolis Speedway, build the first interstate highways in the…

Ancient Explorers: Hanno, Himilco, and Pytheas 0 (0)

From The History Guy. Some 2000 years before the Age of Exploration, maritime traders of the Mediterranean had begun spreading their fleets further than ever before, making some of the first recorded journeys to the western coast of Africa, Britain, and the arctic circle. The voyages of Hanno, Himilco and Pytheas are history that deserves…

Battle of Copenhagen, 1801 0 (0)

From The History Guy. Get your free trial of MagellanTV here: https://try.magellantv.com/historyguy/. It’s an exclusive offer for our viewers: an extended, month-long trial, FREE. MagellanTV is a new kind of streaming service run by filmmakers with 2,000+ documentaries! Check out our personal recommendation and MagellanTV’s exclusive playlists: https://www.magellantv.com/explore/history. Perhaps no single event better represents the…

Repeal Day 0 (0)

From The History Guy. December 5, 2020 marks the 87th anniversary of Repeal Day, the day that the last state necessary — Utah — ratified the twenty-first amendment, officially ending the United States’ 13 year ‘experiment’ with prohibition. For more information on prohibition and organize crime, check out the Mob Museum at www.themobmuseum.org. Check out…