A History of American Barbecue

From The History Guy. Different cultures have been roasting meat over a fire since prehistory. But the practice took on special meaning in the United States. The History Guy remembers a brief history of American barbecue. This is original content based on research by The History Guy. Images in the Public Domain are carefully selected…

Charles Lucas and the First Victoria Cross

From The History Guy. The Victoria Cross was created because of a confluence of a complex and nearly forgotten conflict and developments in technology. This is original content based on research by The History Guy. Images in the Public Domain are carefully selected and provide illustration. As very few images of the actual event are…

Boudica: The Woman Behind the Legend

From The History Guy. Boudica of the Iceni has become a British folk heroine for her dramatic, but brief, stand against the might of the Roman Empire. But all we know of Boudica comes from two Roman historians. The History Guy tries to disentangle legend from history in "Boudica: The Woman Behind the Legend". This…

The Naval Battle of Okinawa

From The History Guy. The Battle of Okinawa was the largest and deadliest battle of the Pacific campaign. But the terrible battle on the island was only part of the fight, as the ships of the Navy faced an onslaught of Kamikaze attacks. The History Guy recalls the many desperate actions to save the ships…

Soapy Smith: A Very Bad Man

From The History Guy. Jefferson "Soapy" Smith was one of the most skilled, and infamous, confidence men in United States history. He was "so dirty he made a crime out of soap". His life of crime is a ripping yarn and a cautionary tale that deserves to be remembered. This is original content based on…

1781 Battle of Jersey

From The History Guy. Most Americans don’t seem to realize that the American Revolution sparked a broader war that engulfed the world, not just in North America, but in Europe, the Caribbean, Africa, India, and the island of Jersey. The 1781 Battle of Jersey only lasted about half an hour, but it represented the breadth…

Challenge Coins: A Military Tradition

From The History Guy. Challenge coins have a long tradition in the United States military. But their history is perhaps more legend than fact. The History Guys explores the forgotten history underlying the tradition of challenge coins. This is original content based on research by The History Guy. Images in the Public Domain are carefully…

The Adventures of Marco Polo

From The History Guy. Signup for your FREE trial to The Great Courses Plus here: http://ow.ly/zzmJ30qK1D4 When asked about Marco Polo, people today are more familiar with the game of tag played in a swimming pool than the thirteenth century explorer. But the book,"The travels of Marco Polo" opened Europe’s eyes to the Great Mongol…

Rangers and the 116th Infantry Regiment: D-DAY+2

From The History Guy. Events behind Omaha beach on "D-Day +2" helped to secure the allied invasion of "Fortress Europe". Rangers were rescued, a resort town taken, and a Medal of Honor earned. The History Guy remembers the extraordinary events of the day after the day after D-Day. This is original content based on research…

The Battle of Merville Gun Battery

From The History Guy. In the early morning hours of June 6, 1944, men of the British Ninth Parachute Battalion must disable a heavy gun battery that is within range of Sword Beach. The History Guy recounts one of the million acts of bravery on D-Day that deserves to be remembered. This is original content…

A History of Time Zones

From The History Guy. Today we use time zones to standardize the clock from place to place, but for most of history that difference was merely relative, and never exact. It wasn’t until relatively recently that anyone made an effort to standardize time with a set of rules. The History Guy recalls the forgotten story…

On the Fringe of the French Empire: Fort de Chartres

From The History Guy. Located in rural Randolph County, Illinois, Fort de Chartres seems out of place. The imposing limestone fort with fifteen foot walls once stood as the seat of government for the vast "Illinois country," and a symbol of hopes for the future of New France. The History Guy recalls the forgotten history…

The Don Lee Broadcasting System

From The History Guy. We all know the big three U.S. television networks: NBC, ABC and CBS, but one nearly forgotten early network was ahead of them all. Many early television firsts came from an experimental Los Angeles station owned by a car dealer and run by a genius engineer. The independent streak of the…

Johnny Appleseed: Man Behind the Legend

From The History Guy. Usually portrayed as a lanky man wearing a long-handled pot on his head and spreading apple seeds, the real Johnny Appleseed was a shrewd businessman and religious zealot who played an important role in U.S. westward expansion effort. The History Guy explores the reality underlying the character of American folklore. This…

Douglas Munro and the Battle of the Matanikau

From The History Guy. In September 1942, a group of U.S. marines was trapped behind enemy lines. A group of Navy landing craft came to the rescue, under the leadership of two Coast Guardsmen. The History Guy tells the story of the only U.S. Coast Guardsman to have been awarded the Medal of Honor. It…

Qin Shi Huang: First Emperor of China

From The History Guy. The Qin took just nine years to overcome their rivals in the warring states and unify China, all under a single king. Qin Shi Huang’s dynasty would mark the beginning of the age of Imperial China. The History Guy recalls the era of subterfuge, intrigue and war that brought the emperor…

Johnston Atoll, Island of the Cold War

From The History Guy. Some 750 miles from Hawaii, tiny Johnston Atoll was developed into an airbase and seaplane base during the Second World War. After the war, the developed facilities on a remote base put Johnston at the center of Cold War programs from nuclear tests to spy satellites to storing leftover chemical weapons.…

Confederate Ram CSS Albemarle

From The History Guy. After the success of CSS Virginia at the Battle of Hampton Roads, the Confederacy decided to build a smaller ironclad on North Carolina’s Roanoke river. The CSS Albemarle stunned the federal fleet before being targeted by the man who has been called, "the first Navy SEAL." The History Guy recalls the…