How To Survive the Little Ice Age 0 (0)

From PBS Eons. Check out Overview’s landfills episode: https://youtu.be/aHzltu6Tvl8 Celebrate Earth Day with PBS! https://youtube.com/playlist?list=PLnNZYWyBGJ1F8ofFm4H9UTrHxqU8zngK4 Nunalleq, a village in what’s today southwest Alaska, seemed to have thrived during the Little Ice Age. How did this village manage to survive and prosper during the Little Ice Age, and what caused this period of climate change in…

How Worm Holes Ended Wormworld 0 (0)

From PBS Eons. Elongated tubes, flat ribbons, and other “worm-like” body plans were so varied and abundant that a part of the Ediacaran is sometimes known as Wormworld. But in the end, the ancient Wormworld was ended by the actions of its very own worms. Thanks to Franz Anthony (http://franzanth.com) for the incredible illustrations of…

The Genes We Lost Along the Way 0 (0)

From PBS Eons. Our DNA holds thousands of dead genes and we’ve only just begun to unravel their stories. But one thing is already clear: we’re not just defined by the genes that we’ve gained over the course of our evolution, but also by the genes that we’ve lost along the way. Thanks to these…

When We First Talked 0 (0)

From PBS Eons. The evolution of our ability to speak is its own epic saga and it’s worth pausing to appreciate that. It’s taken several million years to get to this moment where we can tell you about how it took several million years for us to get here. Thanks to these illustrators for their…

The Reign of the Hell Ants 0 (0)

From PBS Eons. This ancient species had the same six legs and segmented body that we’d recognize from an ant today. But it also had a huge, scythe-like jaw and a horn coming out of its head. This bizarre predator belonged to a group known as “hell ants.” But they’re gone now, and we’re still…

National Fossil Day Livestream! 0 (0)

From PBS Eons. Our "Night at the Virtual Museum" livestream will now be streaming on both YouTube and Facebook. To celebrate National Fossil Day, PBS Eons hosts Kallie Moore, Blake de Pastino, and Michelle Barboza-Ramirez will be competing in a virtual scavenger hunt at the Smithsonian NMNH’s Deep Time exhibit, where their fossil knowledge will…

The First and Last North American Primates 0 (0)

From PBS Eons. How To Vote in Every State: https://youtube.com/HowToVoteInEveryState Early primates not only lived in North America — our primate family tree actually originated here! So what happened to those early relatives of ours? Thank you to these paleoartists for allowing us to use their wonderful illustrations: Nobu Tamura: https://spinops.blogspot.com/ Julio Lacerda: https://twitter.com/JulioTheArtist Fabrizio…

When Rodents Had Horns 0 (0)

From PBS Eons. These odd rodents belong to a genus known as Ceratogaulus, but they’re more commonly called horned gophers, because, you guessed it, they had horns. And it turns out the horns probably had a purpose – one that rodents would likely benefit from today. Samantha Hopkins’ 2005 paper on Ceratogaulus with figures featured in…

The Sea Monster from the Andes 0 (0)

From PBS Eons. In 1977, a farmer was plowing his field on a plateau high in the Andes mountains when he stumbled upon a giant fossilized skeleton. How did this giant marine reptile end up high in the Andes Mountains? Spanish subtitles/CC by Carlos J. Pardo De la Hoz. Thanks as always to Ceri Thomas for…

The Dinosaur Who Was Buried at Sea 0 (0)

From PBS Eons. Paleontologists have been studying nodosaurs since the 1830s, but nobody had ever found a specimen like Borealopelta before. The key to its exceptional preservation was where it ended up after it died and how it got there. Thanks to the Royal Tyrrell Museum of Palaeontology for providing us with images for this…