Make Business Better: Quartz CEO Zach Seward in conversation with Prudential’s Jamie Kalamarides 0 (0)

From Quartz. Watch our interview with John J. (Jamie) Kalamarides, President of Prudential Financial Group Insurance. Quartz CEO Zach Seward asks Jamie about the state of employee paid leave in the US, the systemic racial wealth gap, and the necessary combination of federal solutions, state policy initiatives, and private employer support to ease employee financial…

Make Business Better: Quartz CEO Zach Seward in conversation with Salesforce’s Dr Ashwini Zenooz 0 (0)

From Quartz. Watch our interview with Dr. Ashwini Zenooz, Chief Medical Officer at Salesforce. Quartz CEO Zach Seward speaks to Dr. Zenooz about the role Salesforce is playing in Covid-19 vaccine management and distribution, how leaders in any organization can prioritize employee health and the larger community, and the importance of digital health transformation and…

How do we ensure equitable access to critical vaccines? 0 (0)

From Quartz. Thanks to unprecedented investment and collaboration between governments and the pharmaceutical industry, Covid-19 vaccines were developed in record time. Our current challenge is distributing them quickly and fairly. How can governments and companies work together to speed up drug development and distribution, strengthen supply chains, prevent shortages, and encourage public acceptance of vaccines?…

How do we bring women back to the workforce? 0 (0)

From Quartz. Amy Klobuchar joined us for Make Business Better, a new series with Quartz editor in chief, Katherine Bell, about how we can make companies, industries, and the whole global economy more sustainable and inclusive. For our inaugural event, we tackling the question: How do we bring women back to the workforce? We explored…

Exceptional multitaskers are a scientific anomaly 0 (0)

From Quartz. In episode five of our video series Exceptional Humans, we search for supertaskers in our own office, to see how the Quartz staff compares to the general public. We ended up finding two, and have Strayer quiz one of them on her ability—discussing where it comes from, and what it means for the…

How to speed read, according to scientists 0 (0)

From Quartz. In episode three of our video series Exceptional Humans, we go to London to compete against Holloway in a speed-reading competition, and then to Germany, where researchers are doing breakthrough research to show that with a few straightforward adjustments, we all can be better, faster readers. This story was originally published on November…

A rare trait may hold the secret to better memory 0 (0)

From Quartz. In episode two of our video series Exceptional Humans, we go to Italy to spend time with Carletti in San Leo and in Rome, where researchers scan her brain to unlock the secrets of her memory. We also make a detour to the Netherlands, where researchers in Nijmegen are studying an entirely different…

Lessons from people who hardly need any sleep 0 (0)

From Quartz. In episode one of our video series Exceptional Humans, we crisscross the US, spending a day with Evans in Pennsylvania, and then following her to San Francisco, where she and her sister visited a lab so researchers could monitor their brains as they slept. We get an inside view into cutting-edge research that’s…

How to grow weed in China, legally 0 (0)

From Quartz. Cannabis is fast becoming the world’s newest cash crop. In southwest China’s Yunnan province, farmers make more money growing and selling the plant than they can from more common crops like corn or wheat. But growing weed in China is not as simple as planting seeds in the ground. Many places in the…

The rise of China has created a new kind of Chinatown 0 (0)

From Quartz. Chinatowns aren’t what they used to be. A newer, more modern version of them is emerging across the English-speaking world. These new Chinese settlements have established themselves in New York, Sydney, LA, Melbourne, Vancouver, Toronto, and beyond. Historically, old Chinatowns were urban and almost exclusively settled by low-skilled laborers. Settling in one those…

Is WeChat a problem for democracies? 0 (0)

From Quartz. Politicians from Canada, the US and Australia have all turned to Chinese “super app” WeChat to reach Chinese voters in their countries. In this latest episode of Because China, we go to Australia to understand how WEChat could affect elections and democratic processes of another country. We break down how misinformation travels within…

How China’s swine fever epidemic turned into a global crisis 0 (0)

From Quartz. In just a year, a virus known as “African Swine Fever” has wiped out about half of China’s pig herd, the largest in the world, and has since spread to neighboring countries in Asia. The ASF epidemic offers a rare window into understanding China’s fragmented, underdeveloped agriculture sector, and how it can have…

What we can learn from magicians about managing risk 0 (0)

From Quartz. Good magic feels like it’s all up to chance—the right card happens to be in the right place at the right time. All of that is, of course, an illusion, achieved through hours and hours of practice. Rachel Wax works in fashion by day and magic by night in Speakeasy Magick at The…

Most of us are risk illiterate—but we can fix that 0 (0)

From Quartz. We all hit the same pitfalls when gauging risk: we underestimate it, overestimate it, and misunderstand key information. In the first episode of RISK, we meet Sam Antar, former white collar criminal. Then we travel to the world’s first Center for Risk Literacy in Berlin to learn why most of us are "risk…

Will virtual dating outlast the pandemic? 0 (0)

From Quartz. For the first time in history, virtually everyone who’s dating is dating virtually. Covid-19 has forced a pivot to video for many of the estimated 41% of online singles on dating apps worldwide. And an ongoing slow shift within the industry has accelerated. Bumble, which launched in-app video chat in 2019, said its…

How coronavirus is making Olympic athletes train under quarantine 0 (0)

From Quartz. Professional athletes don’t normally work from home. But from February into early March, as coronavirus began upending sports competitions around the world, Olympians found themselves training in not-so-state-of-the-art facilities—often their living rooms, their balconies, or even their family barns. For weeks, many were training this way and still planning to compete this July…