What actually makes something “flushable”? 0 (0)

From Verge Science. Wipes and other products that get flushed down the toilet cause millions of dollars in problems for cities like New York. They clog up the machinery at sewage plants like the Wards Island Wastewater Treatment Plant. The Verge Science video team went to see the damage wipes can do, and got up…

This metal is more valuable than gold 0 (0)

From Verge Science. The theft of catalytic converters is on the rise due to the value of the precious metals they contain. One of these metals, palladium, is now more valuable than gold and is crucial in helping to clean up toxic emissions. As soaring demand creates a palladium crunch, the race is on to…

Is it time to say goodbye to the gas stove? 0 (0)

From Verge Science. The debate over which stove to use is moving beyond our kitchens, and into our energy grid. More and more research is showing that natural gas is not the harmless energy source it was once thought to be. As some cities are taking action in the race to reduce emissions, the natural…

How a metal with a memory will shape our future on Mars 0 (0)

From Verge Science. Nitinol, a “memory” metal that can remember its original shape when heated, is an industrial gem that will play a key role in NASA’s next mission to Mars. Subscribe: http://bit.ly/2FqJZMl Like Verge Science on Facebook: http://bit.ly/2hoSukO Follow on Twitter: http://bit.ly/2Kr29B9 Follow on Instagram: https://goo.gl/7ZeLvX Read More: http://www.theverge.com Community guidelines: http://bit.ly/2D0hlAv Subscribe to…

Who owns the boats looting the high seas? 0 (0)

From Verge Science. The high seas are ungoverned, international waters where exploitation is rampant because companies can operate with great anonymity. To put a stop to this behavior researchers are using old technology to spotlight out who’s really fishing in these international waters. The Verge’s sponsors play an important role in funding our journalism but…

Why the risk of space collisions is skyrocketing now 0 (0)

From Verge Science. Earth’s orbit is becoming increasingly crowded with satellites, debris, and other space junk — and with companies like Elon Musk’s Starlink pumping more hardware into space, the chances of collisions in orbit are on the rise. We speak with Moriba Jah, a researcher who’s tracking all the space junk in orbit, and…

We put a 2020 time capsule inside DNA 0 (0)

From Verge Science. As 2020 comes to a close, we look back on the big and small science stories of the year by building a digital time capsule. And we store our data using a remarkable new storage medium: synthetic DNA. As a companion to this video, we built an interactive webpage where you can…

The quest for Nikola Tesla’s wireless power technology 0 (0)

From Verge Science. Nikola Tesla’s biggest dream was a worldwide network of wireless power transmission. He built a lab and a massive prototype transmission tower…that never worked. But, a century later, engineers are chasing the same dreams of wireless power and making some tantalizing headway. So was Tesla onto something? Thanks to the Tesla Science…

Is gold actually that rare? We found some! 0 (0)

From Verge Science. Gold is arguably the most precious metal in the world, but how rare is it really? We went on our own gold panning expedition to find out. Correction (6:08): While there was active gold mining around Butte, Montana, the Berkeley Pit mine pictured was primarily a copper mine. Further reading: “Gold Panning…

Powering a real city with a virtual power plant 0 (0)

From Verge Science. Residential solar panels and battery backups are becoming more and more popular as efficiency rises and costs sink. This explosion in distributed solar makes a new idea possible: virtual power plants, or a smart network of individual solar panels that can act like a big power plant when electricity is needed most.…

This gas on Venus could be a new sign of life 0 (0)

From Verge Science. Astronomers have detected a gas on Venus called phosphine, and weirdly enough, it could be a sign of alien life in the planet’s clouds. It’s still too early to say for sure that Venus hosts life forms, but the discovery opens up a lot of questions about what’s happening on Earth’s neighbor.…

Here’s what police body cameras don’t show you 0 (0)

From Verge Science. Body cameras have become a pillar of police accountability efforts over the last decade. And more recently, Black Lives Matter protests have resulted in countless captured moments of police violence for the public to scrutinize. But as recent research shows, the kind of footage captured can influence our opinions of police…in ways…

I mapped my entire apartment’s Wi-Fi signal 0 (0)

From Verge Science. So you’ve got crappy Wi-Fi. What do you do when you’ve rebooted your router, checked all your cables, called your ISP, and your Wi-Fi still fails you? Obviously, you model the physics of Wi-Fi moving through space. And then test the math, square foot by square foot. Becca Farsace and Cory Zapatka…

One rocket launch can’t unify America 0 (0)

From Verge Science. In May, SpaceX and NASA launched their historic DM-2 mission while protests over the death of George Floyd roiled the country. Can the space industry hope to unite Americans behind a common cause, when it largely ignores the division and injustice here on the ground? See Leland Melvin’s full video message about…

SpaceX just launched humans to space for the first time 0 (0)

From Verge Science. Elon Musk’s aerospace company, SpaceX, just successfully launched its first two people into orbit, ushering in a new age of human spaceflight in the United States. SpaceX is now the first company to send passengers to orbit on a privately made vehicle, and the flight marked the first time astronauts have launched…

The coronavirus is mutating. But don’t freak out yet. 0 (0)

From Verge Science. The coronavirus, SARS-CoV-2, is mutating. It’s true, but that’s not necessarily a bad thing. It sounds concerning — if the virus is changing, that could imply that it’s getting worse. That’s not the case. Although it’s true that the coronavirus is mutating, that doesn’t mean it’s getting more dangerous. In fact, it…

The problem with tracking fevers during coronavirus 0 (0)

From Verge Science. Since the start of the coronavirus pandemic, many of us have worked a new routine into our lives: temperature taking. It’s understandable since fever is an extremely common symptom of COVID-19. But if you take your temperature regularly, you’ve probably noticed that your body is rarely 98.6 degrees Fahrenheit (or 37 degrees…