The Double Life of a Truck Driver

From The Atlantic. Deep within Trump’s America, destitute truck drivers confide their anxieties, frustrations, hopes, and fears in the chaplain of a mobile chapel. Read more: https://www.theatlantic.com/video/index/595678/truck-driver-chapel/ “Destination Park” was directed by Emmy-winning documentary filmmaker Andrew Cohn (http://seven34films.com). It is part of The Atlantic Selects, an online showcase of documentary films from independent creators, curated…

Work Is the New God

From The Atlantic. Should a job provide a paycheck or a purpose? Traditional religion lends some people meaning, community, and self-actualization. For many Americans, work has stepped in to fill that role. But this all-encompassing worship of work is setting us up for mass anxiety and inevitable burnout, says Atlantic staff writer Derek Thompson. For…

George Was the Last of His Kind

From The Atlantic. Snails in Hawaii are disappearing faster than any animal on the planet. “This is happening so fast, it’s as if something really catastrophic is happening in the world right now,” says scientist Dave Sischo, who is fighting to save Hawaii’s snail populations.

Two Kids. Two Undiagnosed Disabilities.

From The Atlantic. Colbie, age eight, and Lleyton, five, have normal brains. At least, that’s according to the various MRI scans they’ve undergone throughout their short lives. No one can explain why neither child can walk, or why neither child has ever been able to speak a word. “The Unconditional” was directed by Dave Adams…

The Death of the Non-Unanimous Jury

From The Atlantic. The legacy of Jim Crow continues to loom large in the United States. But nowhere is it arguably more evident than in Louisiana. In 1898, a constitutional convention successfully codified a slew of Jim Crow laws in a flagrant effort to disenfranchise black voters and otherwise infringe on their rights. “Our mission…

Haunted By ‘The Hum’: The Unexplained Noise Conspiracy

From The Atlantic. A man is tormented by a low-frequency humming sound emanating from his house. Could it be the “hum,” a mysterious noise heard around the world by thousands of people? Or is that just a collective delusion? Read more: https://www.theatlantic.com/video/index/593992/doom-vibrations/ “Doom Vibrations” was directed by Garret Harkawik (https://www.garretharkawik.com/). It is part of The…

Apollo 11: NASA and Civilians Remember the Moon Landing

From The Atlantic. “It was a feeling that went throughout the world, almost like an electric bolt,” one woman remembers of the Apollo 11 moon landing. The lunar landing, which celebrates its 50th anniversary on July 20, is collectively remembered in the film by a handful of the 530 million people who watched the event…

What Happens in Room 140

From The Atlantic. Undocumented immigrants who are released from ICE detention centers often have nowhere to go. When this happens near Oakland, California, Pastor Gomez gets notified through the small community of Guatemalan immigrants that has formed around the church that he leads. Gomez, who moonlights as a local motel manager, rents a room for…

Why Doctors Are Taking on the NRA

From The Atlantic. “I see more gunshot wounds as a trauma surgeon here in the United States per week than I did when I was serving in Kandahar, Afghanistan,” says Dr. Mallory Williams, chief of the Division of Trauma and Critical Care at Howard University Hospital. “There’s no question about it.” In a new Atlantic…

The Horrific Untold Story of Trans ICE Detention

From The Atlantic. “I decided to come to the U.S. to save my life,” says Luz, a transgender asylum-seeker, in Sylvia Johnson’s short documentary. In Honduras, Luz was shot multiple times by gang members who targeted her for her trans identity. She barely emerged with her life. As soon as she was released from the…

Is This Video a Deepfake?

From The Atlantic. “We are crossing over into an era where we have to be skeptical of what we see on video,” says John Villasenor, a Senior Fellow at The Brookings Institution. Villasenor is talking about deepfakes—videos that are digitally altered in imperceptible ways, often using a machine-learning technique that superimposes existing images onto source…

Wolves: Can’t Live With ‘Em, Can’t Live Without ‘Em

From The Atlantic. Humans don’t have a great track record of coexisting with top predators, and wolves are no exception. By the early 1900s, wolves were nearly extinct in all of Western Europe as a result of government programs that rewarded people for killing them. While the animals’ population numbers dwindled, humans got used to…

Norway’s First Rural Pride Parade

From The Atlantic. “Coming out seemed like the worst thing ever,” says Anbjørn, a resident of Volda, in rural Norway. “You simply feel scared. I think every gay person in a small town has heard the horror stories.” Despite the fear that consumed him in his youth, Anbjørn has embraced his identity in his adult…

Inside Cryonics: Will These Bodies Come Back From Death?

From The Atlantic. Until the day he died, in 2011, Robert Ettinger hoped humanity would figure out a way to cheat death. Today, his body is stored in a chamber filled with liquid nitrogen and frozen to -196 °C. He lies in cryopreservation at the Cryonics Institute in Michigan—which he founded—alongside his late mother, his…

A Gamer’s Secret Life and Tragic Death

From The Atlantic. To his mother, David Hance was a shy, nerdy Puerto Rican kid from the Bronx who had an unhealthy obsession with video games. To everyone else, he was Allied—a world-class esports champion, whose boisterous live-streams garnered thousands of views. For years, Hance navigated these disparate identities with ease. But then, at age…

Sundarbans: The Next Climate Refugees

From The Atlantic. “We were so terrified with the water coming into the house and the sound of the storm. In front of my eyes, the walls of our house collapsed.” That’s Geeta Maiti, a resident of Mousuni Island, part of the Indian Sundarbans—a 4,000 square-mile World Heritage site on the Bay of Bengal, shared…

The Right to Sexuality

From The Atlantic. Paul and Hava met at a performing-arts social event for people with intellectual disabilities. With the assistance of their parents, they went on a few successful dates. The connection was immediate. After some time, they decided to make their strong, loving bond official. The couple made each other so happy that their…

‘Recycling Is Like a Band-Aid on Gangrene’

From The Atlantic. “Recycling is like a Band-Aid on gangrene,” says Dr. Max Liboiron, director of the Civic Laboratory for Environmental Action Research (CLEAR) in Newfoundland. “The only mode of attack is to deal with a heavy decrease in the production of plastics, as opposed to dealing with them after they’ve already been created.” Dr.…

After Prison: What Happens to Formerly Incarcerated Women?

From The Atlantic. After Maryam Henderson-Uloho was convicted of obstruction of justice, she was sentenced to 25 years in a Louisiana prison. Ultimately, she served 13 years—more than half of that time in solitary confinement. When she was released, she felt dehumanized. “You see, in prison, you’re broken—mentally, emotionally, and physically,” says Henderson-Uloho in the…

What It’s Like to Be Intersex

From The Atlantic. “It was like a bomb being dropped into our life.” That’s Isaiah Ngwaru. He’s talking about the moment he and his wife, Betina, discovered their child, Tatenda, was intersex. Although they had been raising her as a boy, Tatenda had railed against the strict masculine norms in their hometown of Gutu, Zimbabwe.…