Cigarettes, Slots, and Other Things that Aren’t Addictive

From Coffee Break.

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After the collapse of the tobacco industry, casinos found themselves under scrutiny for engineering addiction. This is the story of how casinos learned to mislead the public using industry funded research on gambling addiction. The problem of industry funded research isn’t unique to casinos however, it’s widespread and devastating to serious academic inquiry.

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Music in order of appearance:
Blue Wednesday – Herringbone
Blue Wednesday – Magnetic
Blue Wednesday – Cereal Killer
Blue Wednesday – Honey
https://soundcloud.com/bluewednesday
ibrahim – Watermelon Slices
https://soundcloud.com/ibr

Shownotes:
(1) Thank You For Smoking https://www.imdb.com/title/tt0427944/
(2) Clarence Cook Little from the CTR https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=ipXIQ6PIXAk
(3) Slot Machines – The Big Gamble https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=rLD17r0U2D0
(4) Understanding Joy: The Devastation of a Gambling Addiction https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=03kQXimVcrw
(5) Slot Machines: Addiction By Design https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=ETB0x2UU6JE
(6) NCRG Funding Disclosure http://www.ncrg.org/about-ncrg/funding/all-supporters
(7) NCRG, What is a Gambling Disorder https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=zhtzVammR6A
(8) Salon – Gambling With Science https://www.salon.com/2008/06/16/gambling_science/
(9) Addiction By Design – Natasha Dow Shull https://www.amazon.com/Addiction-Design-Machine-Gambling-Vegas-ebook/dp/B0098UQVJC
(10) HMS Funding Tied to Gambling https://www.thecrimson.com/article/2004/11/9/hms-funding-tied-to-gambling-a/
(11) Exxon Misled the Public https://www.nytimes.com/2017/08/23/climate/exxon-global-warming-science-study.html
(12) How the Sugar Industry Shifted Blame https://www.nytimes.com/2016/09/13/well/eat/how-the-sugar-industry-shifted-blame-to-fat.html
(13) Coca-Cola Funds Scientists Who Shift Blame https://well.blogs.nytimes.com/2015/08/09/coca-cola-funds-scientists-who-shift-blame-for-obesity-away-from-bad-diets/
(14) Contesting the Science of Smoking https://www.theatlantic.com/politics/archive/2016/05/low-tar-cigarettes/481116/
(15) GAMBLING WITH AMERICA’S HEALTH – https://psmag.com/social-justice/las-vegas-nevada-legal-gambling-with-americas-public-health-policy-90625
(16) How Purdue Used Misleading Charts to Hide OxyContin’s Addictive Power https://www.cbsnews.com/news/how-purdue-used-misleading-charts-to-hide-oxycontins-addictive-power/
(17) Managing Conflicts of Interest https://www.nap.edu/read/1821/chapter/7
(18) Impact of the NCRG https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=ej7tT9EQidg
(19) Tobacco Influence https://www.industrydocumentslibrary.ucsf.edu/wpost/recent-papers-showing-tobacco-industry-influence-in-peer-reviewed-journals-and-the-ada/
(20) Coffin Nails (1957) https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=BEsRKrCSF2I

Please note: there is a lot of nuance in the discussion of "what to do with conflicts of interest, it doesn’t end at "prohibition or disclose" but for the sake of brevity I had to present the most fundamental approaches. For example, there are different types of conflicts of interest that differ in severity. At worst, you have tobacco researching lung cancer, but a less severe example might be someone has a consulting job for Coca-Cola while separately researching obesity’s link to sugar. These are not the same level of problematic and should be treated differently. I’m for prohibition in cases like "big tobacco researching lung cancer" mostly because we’ve tried the whole mitigate-research-influence and it doesn’t seem to work. Here’s a study demonstrating that industry funded research directly affects the results: https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/26949873
"Studies funded by organizations that are involved in exposing the environment to pollutants or their workers to hazardous materials are substantially less likely to observe an association that these exposures have or increase the risk for negative health consequences"