Why Do Humans Get So Many Sinus Infections?

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From Seeker.

Sinus infections are incredibly common, and it could be linked to our evolution on this planet. In the season 2 premiere of Human, Patrick explains why humans are so prone to these painful infections.
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While it’s natural to worry if your symptoms of a sinus infection might mean you’re positive for COVID-19, we’re here to tell you not to panic. Having a sinus infection can be a sign of the evolutionary process in action.

Viruses cause the majority of sinus infections, but bacteria can trigger them as well. When you do get a sinus infection, that wet mucus gets thicker and more viscous, which causes the typical symptoms — congestion, headache, and difficulty breathing. And those symptoms might be made worse by the plumbing of our sinuses.

Each sinus has a mucous collection duct, or what are called ostia, to shuttle its discarded mucous to the nose and throat. It’s basically plumbing for snot.

#sinuses #sinusinfections #human #physiology #seeker #humanseries

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This Seeker health series will dive deep into the cellular structures, human systems, and overall anatomy that work together to keep our bodies going. Using the visual structure and quick pacing of Seeker’s Sick series, these human bio-focused episodes will give a new audience an inside look on what’s happening inside all of us.

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